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"Don't tell anyone but I only counted 97."

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101 DALMATIONS

One Hundred and One Dalmatians (often abbreviated as 101 Dalmatians) is the seventeenth animated feature in the Disney animated features canon. It was made and produced by Walt Disney Productions, and it was originally released to theaters on January 25, 1961 by Buena Vista Distribution. It is based on the novel The Hundred and One Dalmatians by Dodie Smith. It also appeared in 1961 as a Walt Disney comic book based on the animated film.

The film features Rod Taylor as the voice of Pongo, the first of the Dalmatians, and Betty Lou Gerson as the voice of the villainous Cruella De Vil. The plot centers on the fate of the kidnapped puppies of Pongo and Perdita.

The production of the film signaled a change in the graphic style of Disney's animation. This occurred with the introduction of Xerography which eased graphic reproduction requirements, but at the price of being unable to deviate from a scratchy outline style because of the new (and time and money saving) technology's limitations, recognizable by its thick black lines. The change also happened when Disney cut its animation department after the economical failure of the very expensive Sleeping Beauty, resulting in a reduction of staff from 500 to under 100 and fewer resources put into the movies. Walt Disney, who at this point had started to direct his attention more towards television and his amusement park and less on his animated features, disliked this development. The current look of animation would therefore be the norm for years until the technology improved prior to the release of The Rescuers to allow a softer look. In later animated features the Xeroxed lines could be printed in many different colors.

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101 Dalmatians is a live-action film produced by Walt Disney Pictures in 1996. It is a remake of the 1961 animated film One Hundred and One Dalmatians (which in turn was based on Dodie Smith's 1956 novel The Hundred and One Dalmatians). It stars Glenn Close as the villainous Cruella de Vil, and Jeff Daniels as Roger, the owner of the 101 dalmatians. Unlike the novel and earlier adaptations, none of the animal characters talk. A sequel, 102 Dalmatians, was released in 2000.

Roger is a designer of computer games who shares his home with his pet dalmatian, Pongo. One day, Roger takes Pongo for a walk and the dog sets his eyes on a beautiful female dalmatian named Perdy. Perdy likes Pongo as much as he likes her, and thankfully Perdy's mistress, a fashion designer named Anita, is quite taken with Roger. Romance blossoms between the human and canine couples, and Roger and Anita tie the knot (Pongo and Perdy are apparently still living out of wedlock). Anita works for Cruella de Vil, an intense fashion maven with a lust for fur. Inspired by her dogs, Anita finds herself working up a design for a fur coat made with spotted fur, and Cruella leaps on the idea of making garments out of real dalmatians. But where to get the animals? Cruella has two nasty but not especially intelligent henchmen Jasper and Horace, who have been known to kill the odd endangered species at madame's request. Now they are sent on a mission to round up dalmatians, and when they fall a bit short of their goal, it comes to Cruella's attention that Perdy has just given birth to a litter of 15 puppies.

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