Untitled

Untitled

Find Wonder Woman comics and more at TFAW.com!

Untitled

Untitled

Entertainment Earth

Untitled

"Captain Archer's Beagle, Porthos, going where no Beagle has gone before!"

- W.J. Flywheel, Webporium Curator

Untitled

STAR TREK - ENTERPRISE

Star Trek: Enterprise (originally titled Enterprise) was a science fiction television series set in the Star Trek universe that premiered in the United States on September 26, 2001, following the adventures of the crew of the pre-Federation Enterprise (NX-01), the first human-built vessel to achieve Warp 5.

Enterprise is a prequel to the other Star Trek series and movies. The pilot episode, "Broken Bow", takes place in 2151, ten years before the founding of the Federation and about halfway between the 21st century events shown in the movie Star Trek: First Contact and the original Star Trek series.

Enterprise was cancelled by UPN on February 2, 2005 after a run of four seasons and 98 episodes, making it the first Trek series since the original Star Trek to have been cancelled by its network rather than finished by its producers. Despite the announcement, production of the series was allowed to continue until the end of the season, with the final two episodes on UPN airing on May 13, 2005.

The first two seasons of Enterprise depict the exploration of space by a crew who are able to go farther and faster than any humans had previously gone due to the breaking of the Warp 5 barrier, presenting situations which are not entirely unfamiliar to Star Trek fans but allowing its characters to face them unencumbered by the experience and rules which have built up over hundreds of years of Trek history as in other Star Trek series. Enterprise takes pains to show the origins of some concepts which have become taken for granted in Star Trek canon, such as Reed's development of force fields and Archer's questions about cultural interference which would eventually be answered by the Prime Directive.

The Vulcans are often close by to offer help when needed, but believe that humans are not yet a mature enough species to begin exploring the galaxy and initiating first contact with other alien races. This generates some conflict as, in several early episodes, Archer complains bitterly about the Vulcans looking over his shoulder all the time.

A recurring theme throughout the first three seasons is the "Temporal Cold War", in which a mysterious entity from the future uses technology to help a species known as the Suliban manipulate the timeline and change past events. Sometimes providing bad information to the crew of Enterprise and sometimes saving the ship from destruction, the entity's true motives are unknown. A (mostly) human from Earth's future, Agent Daniels, visits Captain Archer occasionally to assist him in fighting the Suliban and undoing damage to the timeline.

The creators of the series also made the decision to focus increasingly on the three core characters of the series – Archer, Tucker, and T'Pol – in lieu of further developing the supporting characters (Sato, Mayweather, Reed, and Phlox). This format, based upon the similar "triumvirate" format used for the Original Series (which primarily focused on the trio of Kirk, McCoy, and Spock), began to emerge during the first season and has sparked further criticism from fans used to the ensemble format of TNG, DS9, and Voyager, and other recent SF series.

The fact that Earth is not yet the significant interstellar presence it would later become is underscored in the first two seasons with a running joke: whenever an Enterprise crewmember says he or she is from Earth, the alien's response is invariably, "Earth? Never heard of it."

Untitled

Untitled

SEASON 1 DVD

SEASON 2 DVD

SEASON 3 DVD

SEASON 4 DVD

SEASON 1 DVD

SEASON 2 DVD

SEASON 3 DVD

SEASON 4 DVD

 
Low ratings encouraged the series' producers to seek a new direction. The third season changes the series' name to Star Trek: Enterprise and introduces a new enemy, the Xindi, whose goal is the annihilation of the human race due to fears that someday humanity will wipe them out. The entire third season follows one long story arc, which begins in the second season finale "The Expanse" in which the Xindi deploy a prototype weapon which cuts a wide, deep trench from central Florida to Venezuela, killing seven million people. Enterprise is refitted as a warship with the addition of MACOs, seen as the precursor to the heavily armed Starfleet security personnel in other Star Trek series, and travels through the Delphic Expanse to find the Xindi homeworld and prevent another attack against Earth.

Some fans thought the Xindi storyline was a knee jerk reaction to the events of 911 and took the series away from it's Star Trek roots. Roots many feel they were rediscovering in the fouth season. Still, the third season, especially later episodes, were received more favorably by fans and critics. Some of these were written or co-written by Manny Coto, a writer who joined the series in its third season. Coto's other scripts, such as "Similitude" are also considered to be of a higher caliber than earlier stories, which likely contributed to his being promoted to executive producer and show runner for season 4.

The Xindi story arc carried over into the fourth season, being related peripherally to the two-part season premiere, "Storm Front" (being a detour as Enterprise returned to Earth), and "Home" serving as a coda to the arc.

Season 4 - regarded by many fans as the strongest - produced a mixture of two- and three-episode arcs, along with a few standalone episodes. The general theme of the season appeared to be a focus on the prequel concept of the series, with many episodes referencing themes, concepts, and characters from past series. Season 4 saw the finale of the "Temporal Cold War" depicted in the previous three seasons. The fourth season also saw the much anticipated return of Brent Spiner (Data from Star Trek: The Next Generation) as the imprisoned scientist Dr. Arik Soong in a three-episode arc ("Borderland", "Cold Station 12", and "The Augments") involving genetically enhanced superhumans known as "Augments". Coto has stated that his intent was to push the series towards the eventual founding of the United Federation of Planets. It helped immensely that Manny Coto, unlike Rick Berman and Brannon Braga, was a fan of The Original Series.

Season 4 also addressed some discrepancies between the Vulcans of TOS and those depicted in Star Trek: Enterprise. The "Vulcan Civil War" arc ("The Forge", "Awakening", and "Kir'Shara") was hailed as among the most interesting and intricately woven plotlines of the series. In it, the characters meet T'Pau (a character who shows up in The Original Series in the episode "Amok Time") and the audience sees Romulans trying to undermine the stability of the balance in power between the Andorians and Vulcans.

The exploration element of the first two seasons (and previous Trek series) was downplayed in the fourth season, which was informally referred to as the "Solar System Arc" due to the fact that most storylines begin with Enterprise being assigned a mission from Earth, rather than simply encountering adventure through exploration.

The series cancellation was announced prior to the writing of the final episode of the fourth season, which allowed the writing team to craft a series finale. The episodes before this were welcomed by fans - including a two-parter detailing how Klingons become more human-looking during the period of TOS (as well as showing Section 31) and a two-parter taking place in the Mirror Universe and featuring a starship from the TOS era.

The final episode of Enterprise, entitled "These Are the Voyages ...", aired May 13 in the United States, and was one of the most heavily criticized episodes the Star Trek franchise ever aired as a series finale -- much of the criticism focusing on the premise, which essentially reduced the finale to a holodeck adventure from an earlier Star Trek series. The episode featured guest appearances by Jonathan Frakes and Marina Sirtis as their Star Trek: The Next Generation characters William Riker and Deanna Troi. The show took place during the TNG episode "The Pegasus". Brent Spiner, another TNG veteran who had guest-starred earlier in the fourth season, had a speaking role as Data.

On Star Trek The Next Generation, Riker joined the crew of the Enterprise during what mission?

Farside mission
Fairpoint mission
Farscape mission
Farpoint mission

Untitled

SEASON 1 DVD

SEASON 2 DVD

SEASON 3 DVD

Untitled

Content intended for informational and educational purposes under the GNU Free Documentation Areement.
"Star Trek", the Star Trek logos and images copyright © CBS Studios Inc.

Untitled
Share

HOME - SEARCH - ABOUT US - TERMS - SITE MAP - NEWS - LINKS - CONTESTS - HALL OF FAME - AV CLUB - TRIVIAOGRAPHY - THE BIG STORE
Original material © Copyright 2020myneatstuff.ca - All other material © Copyright their respective owners.

When wasting time on the interweb why not visit our Kasey and Company Cartoon site?