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Supergirl

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SUPERGIRL

Supergirl is a fictional superheroine appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics. Supergirl was created to be a female counterpart to DC's popular hero Superman. The character was created by writer Otto Binder and designed by artist Al Plastino in 1959. She first appeared in the Action Comics comic book series and later branched out into animation, film, television, and merchandising.

Since being introduced in 1959, a number of different characters have assumed the Supergirl mantle over the decades, with the most popular and enduring version of the character being Kara Zor-El, Superman's cousin, who shares his super powers and vulnerability to Kryptonite. Supergirl plays a supporting role in various DC Comics publications, including Action Comics, Superman, and several comic book series unrelated to Superman. In 1969, Supergirl's adventures became the lead feature in Adventure Comics, and she later starred in her own comic book series which debuted in 1972 and ran until 1974, followed by a second monthly comic book series titled The Daring New Adventures of Supergirl, which ran from 1982 to 1984.

Due to changing editorial policy at DC, Supergirl was initially killed off in the 1985 limited series Crisis on Infinite Earths. DC Comics subsequently rebooted the continuity of the DC Comics Universe, re-establishing Superman's character as the sole survivor of Krypton's destruction. Following the conclusion of Crisis on Infinite Earths, several different characters written as having no familial relationship to Superman have assumed the role of Supergirl, including Matrix, Linda Danvers, and Cir-El. Following the cancellation of the third, 1996-2003 Supergirl comic book series, starring the Matrix/Linda Danvers version of the character, a modern version of Kara Zor-El was reintroduced into the DC Comics continuity in issue #8 of the Superman/Batman comic book series titled "The Supergirl from Krypton" (2004).

SUPER... GIRLS

Lois Lane (Superwoman)

The first comic ever to feature a female counterpart to Superman is "Lois Lane - Superwoman", a story published in Action Comics #60 (May 1943), in which a hospitalized Lois dreams she has gained Kryptonesque superpowers thanks to a blood transfusion from the Man of Steel. She begins her own career as Superwoman, complete with copycat costume. Similar stories with Lois Lane acquiring such powers and adopting the name "Superwoman" periodically appeared later. One such story is in Action Comics #156 (May 1951), in which Lois accidentally gains those powers through an invention of Superman's arch-foe, Lex Luthor. In the story, Lois wears a short blond wig in her crime-fighting identity, giving her an appearance almost identical to the later version of Supergirl after the latter's real name was specified as Kara Zor-El.

Queen Lucy, Super-Girl

In Superboy #5 (November - December 1949) in a story titled "Superboy Meets Supergirl", Superboy meets Queen Lucy of the fictional Latin American nation of Borgonia. She is a stellar athlete and scholar. Tired of her duties and wanting to enjoy a normal life, Queen Lucy travels to Smallville, where she meets Superboy and soon wins his heart. Superboy puts on a show with her where he uses his powers to make her seem superhuman; during this contest, she is called Super-Girl. As Super-Girl, Queen Lucy wears a tan dress with a brown cape and Superboy's "S" symbol. Superboy later saves her from a scheming minister. She returns to her throne, leaving Superboy to wonder if she ever thinks of him.

Claire Kent

In the Superboy #78 story titled "Claire Kent, Alias Super-Sister", Superboy saves an alien woman named Shar-La from a life-threatening crash. After he ridicules her driving, Shar-La turns Superboy into a girl. In Smallville, Clark Kent (Superman's alter ego) claims to be Claire Kent, an out-of-town relative who is staying with the Kents. When in costume, he plays Superman's sister, Super-Sister, and claims the two have exchanged places. As a girl ridiculed and scorned by men, he wants to prove he is as good as he always was. In the end, it is revealed that the transformation is just an illusion created by Shar-La. Superboy learns not to ridicule women.

Super-Girl

In Superman #123 (August 1958), Jimmy Olsen uses a magic totem to wish a "Super-Girl" into existence as a companion and helper for Superman; however, the two frequently get in each other's way until she is fatally injured protecting Superman from a Kryptonite meteor that a criminal has dropped towards him. At her insistence, Jimmy wishes the dying girl out of existence. DC used this story to gauge public response to the concept of a completely new female counterpart to Superman. In the original issue, she has blond hair and her costume is blue and red like Superman's; indeed, it closely resembles the uniform that actress Helen Slater would later wear in the 1984 movie. Early reprints of this story show her with red hair and an orange and green costume to prevent readers from confusing her with the then current Supergirl character. Much later, the story was again reprinted in its original form.

Supergirl (Kara Zor-El)

After positive fan reaction to Super-Girl, the first recurring and most familiar version of Supergirl debuted in 1959. Kara Zor-El first appeared in Action Comics #252 (May 1959). The story that introduced the character was drawn by Al Plastino and written by Otto Binder, who had also created Mary Marvel, Captain Marvel's sister and female spinoff. Like Supergirl, Mary Marvel was a teen-age female version of an adult male superhero, wearing a costume that was identical to the older character's other than substituting a short skirt for tight trousers. Binder also created Miss America, a superhero who shared little other than the name with her sometime co-star Captain America.

Reaction at the D.C. Comics offices to Supergirl's first appearance was tremendous, with thousands of positive letters pouring in.

Kara Zor-El (originally, just Kara; Kryptonians during the Golden Era used a single name for most women, and a two-syllable name for men; thus the addition of the patronymic to the female name is a contemporary convention) is the last survivor of Argo City, which had survived the explosion of the planet Krypton and drifted through space. The city had been covered by a plastic dome for weather moderation, devised by Zor-El, the younger brother of Superman's father Jor-El, a climatologist and engineer. The dome held together a large chunk of land mass under the city as it drifted through space in the general direction of our solar system. However, the bottom-most layers of bedrock were affected by the explosion of the great planet's fissionable core and underwent a slow but steady chain-reaction, turning into green Kryptonite. Using raw deposits and refined materials at hand, the residents of Argo City laid down a ground shield of lead foil to protect them from the developing Kryptonite. Zor-El was also able to fashion a makeshift propulsion system to try to accelerate the city's approach to the Solar System.

During the roughly thirty years Argo City traveled through space, Zor-El met and married Alura, daughter of In-Ze, who in turn bore their daughter, Kara, blond like her parents. But before the propulsion system was able to steer the city toward Earth, a deranged citizen named Jer-Em, who was suffering from survival guilt, damaged the exhaust, veering Argo toward a swarm of meteors that crashed into the underside of the land mass on which it rested. As the inhabitants of the colony were being slain by the green Kryptonite radiation released by meteorites shredding the lead barrier, the adolescent Kara was sent to Earth by her father Zor-El in a rocket, to be raised by her cousin Kal-El (Superman). Fearing that she might not be recognized by Superman, Kara's parents provided her with a uniform which was closely based on the one Kal was wearing as the Man of Steel.

It was later learned Zor-El and Alura survived the radiation poisoning that killed everyone else in Argo City by entering the Survival Zone, a parallel continuum akin to the Phantom Zone. They were eventually rescued by Supergirl and decided to live in the bottle city of Kandor. Eventually, Kara is reunited with her parents. However, that reunion becomes bittersweet, as Reactron kills her father, and her mother dies when New Krypton is destroyed by a trap in Reactron left by Lex Luthor, her own cousin Superman's greatest enemy on Earth, and now her greatest enemy on Earth as well.

On Earth, Kara acquires powers identical to Superman's and adopts the secret identity of Linda Lee, a resident of Midvale Orphanage. She conceals her blonde hair beneath a brunette wig and functions as Supergirl only in secret, at Superman's request, until she can gain, in his opinion, sufficient control of her powers, and the wisdom to properly use them. During this period her powers were stolen by a Kandorian villainess and she is adopted by Fred and Edna Danvers. Later her power are restored and Superman decides his cousin is ready to begin operating openly as Supergirl.

She attends Midvale High School as Linda Lee Danvers. In later years, after graduating from Stanhope College, she changes careers several times, holding jobs in student counseling, news reporting, and acting in a TV soap opera titled Secret Hearts. She also attends college in Chicago. Kara has many boyfriends, including Richard (Dick) Malverne, Jerro the Merboy from Atlantis, and Brainiac 5, a member of the Legion of Super-Heroes. She does, however, shun serious commitments, putting her super-career first.

Supergirl's secret identity is a closely held secret known only to Superman, her foster parents, and the Legion of Super-Heroes, of which she is as a member for a time. Like all Kryptonians, Supergirl is vulnerable to Kryptonite. Streaky, her orange cat, acquires temporary superpowers as a result of its exposure to "X-Kryptonite," a form of Kryptonite Supergirl accidentally created in an unsuccessful attempt to neutralize the effects of Green Kryptonite. Comet the Superhorse, a former centaur, is Supergirl's equine companion.

Supergirl and Batgirl (Barbara Gordon) team-up for the very first time in 1967. The two will become good friends and continue to team-up on occasion over the years. In 1970, Supergirl gets a new costume from Wonder Woman’s boutique (this was during the time that Wonder Woman had lost her powers and owned a boutique in-between traveling the world as a martial arts hero). Around this time DC starts a regular practice of changing Supergirl’s costume every couple of issues, sometimes using submitted designs in order to increase reader interest.

Over the course of the next few years, Supergirl would wear a myriad of different costumes. The most short-lived was a gown worn in Adventure Comics #402, which she only wears for a few panels on her date with some guy named Derek. Another was an update of a previous costume with a few very modifications that were very trendy and cool at the time, a hip-hugger belt, hot pants and lace-up boots with tassles. She also wore a full-body spandex suit with gloves, looking more like Sue Storm than Supergirl, and a "Battlesuit" (also with gloves) and buckaneer boots, lots of yellow trim and a larger belt.

In 1972 Supergirl finally settles on a new costume design that involves hot pants, pixie shoes, and a loose blouse with a smaller S-shield over her heart, but it would not be her last costume change.

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One way DC demonstrated the epic nature of its 12-issue limited series Crisis on Infinite Earths (April 1985 - March 1986) was through the deaths of important characters. In issue #7 (October 1985), Supergirl sacrifices her life to save her cousin and the multiverse from destruction.

When the Superman continuity rebooted after the Crisis on Infinite Earths, DC editors felt that Superman should be the sole survivor of Krypton, resulting in Kara being removed. Unlike a number of other characters who are shown dying in the Crisis, no one remembers Kara dying or even ever having existed.

After the events of Infinite Crisis, the sequel to Crisis on Infinite Earths, many historical events from the multiverse are now being remembered. Donna Troy (Wonder Girl), after her rebirth and inheritance of Harbinger's Orb, recalls the original Kara Zor-El and her sacrifice.

DC Editorial wanted Superman to be the only surviving Kryptonian following DC's post-Crisis reboot of the Superman continuity. As a result, when DC reintroduced Supergirl, she needed a non-Kryptonian origin. Afterward, DC Comics tried to revamp the Supergirl concept, introducing several more non-Kryptonian Supergirls. Eventually, the rule that Superman should be the only Kryptonian survivor was relaxed, allowing for a return of Kara Zor-El as his cousin.

As part of The New 52, Kara's origin was rebooted once again. An amnesiac Kara awakens after her lifepod crashes to Earth in the midst of a meteor shower. Upon emerging, she encounters humans and the extent of her powers for the first time. When encountered by Superman, she attacks him, believing him to be an imposter as her cousin was only a baby when she last saw him.

Supergirl (Matrix)

After the post-Crisis reboot in the late 1980s, Supergirl's origin was completely rewritten. No longer was she Superman's cousin or even Kryptonian. In Superman v2, #16 (April 1988), a new Supergirl debuted as a man-made lifeform made of synthetic protoplasm created by a heroic Lex Luthor of a "pocket continuum". Lex implants her with Lana Lang's memories, and she can shapeshift to resemble Lana. Matrix even believes herself to be Lana for a time. She wears a miniskirted version of Superman's costume, but does not have Superman's exact powers. While she can fly and possesses super-strength (like Superman), she also has psychokinetic, shape shifting and cloaking/invisibility powers. (The last makes her undetectable even to Superman.)

Matrix's Supergirl form resembles the pre-Crisis Supergirl. She lives in Smallville with the Kents, who treated "Mae" like their own daughter. While new to Earth, Matrix begins a romance with the DC Universe's Lex Luthor, until she realizes Luthor's villainous nature. She leaves him to find her own way in the world, serving for a time as a member of the Teen Titans and a hero in her own right.

 
Supergirl (Linda Danvers)

Beginning in September 1996, DC published a Supergirl title written by Peter David. The 1996 Supergirl comic revamped the previous Matrix Supergirl by merging her with a human being, resulting in a new Supergirl. Many elements of the pre-Crisis Supergirl were incorporated in new ways. The woman that Matrix merges with has the same name as pre-Crisis Supergirl's secret identity, Linda Danvers. The series is set in the town of Leesburg, named after Danvers' pre-adoption surname. Linda's father is named Fred Danvers, the same as pre-Crisis Supergirl's adopted father. Furthermore, new versions of Dick Malverne and Comet appear as part of the supporting cast.

As the series begins, Matrix sacrifices herself to save a dying Linda Danvers, and their bodies, minds, and souls merge to become an "Earth-Born Angel", a being created when one being selflessly sacrifices him or herself to save another who is beyond saving. As the angel, Supergirl loses some of her powers, but gains others, including fiery angel wings and a "shunt" ability that allows her to teleport to any place she has been before.

The angelic aspect of Supergirl eventually falls from grace, and Linda and Matrix are separated into two beings. Linda retains some of Supergirl's super-strength and durability, and although she can no longer fly, she can leap an eighth of a mile.

Peter David's creator-owned series Fallen Angel, published by DC Comics, features a character, Lee, who is similar to Linda and explores the same themes as his Supergirl series. Prior to Fallen Angel moving to another company, Lee was written in a manner such that she could have been Linda. Though David remained coy as to whether the two characters were one and the same during the DC run of the title, after it moved to IDW, David revealed Lee's origin, which clearly showed that Lee was not Danvers. However, Fallen Angel #14 introduced "Lin," who was said to be Lee's "predecessor" and had recently escaped Limbo, an apparent metaphor for what happened to Danvers after the cancellation of Supergirl. David said fans of his tenure on Supergirl, particularly those who are torqued because Linda Danvers was consigned to oblivion in the DC Universe,, "must, must, MUST pick up Fallen Angel #14 and #15." However, since David could not explicitly claim that a character owned by DC was the same as the character he owned, he stated, "Can I say this is Linda Danvers? Of course I can't. However, it's pretty freaking obvious that it is."

According to an interview with Newsarama, the Matrix Supergirl is wiped from existence by the events depicted in the 2005 limited series Infinite Crisis, although Infinite Crisis writer Geoff Johns later stated that Danvers is not. The debate was finally settled in the 2008 mini-series Reign in Hell.

 
Supergirl (Cir-El)

A Supergirl named Cir-El appeared in 2003's Superman: The 10 Cent Adventure #1, claiming to be the future daughter of Superman and Lois Lane. Although she has super-strength, speed, and hearing like Superman, she can only leap great distances. She also possesses the ability to fire blasts of red solar energy. Her alter ego is a street person named Mia. She is later found to be a human girl who was altered by Brainiac on a genetic level to appear Kryptonian; she dies thwarting a plot involving Brainiac 13. Superman (vol. 2) #200 implies that when the timeline realigned itself, Cir-El was erased from existence.

Issue #8 of the Superman/Batman series originally published in 2004 re-introduced Kara Zor-El into the DC continuity. Like the pre-Crisis version, this Kara claims to be the daughter of Superman's uncle Zor-El and aunt Alura In-Ze. Unlike the traditional Supergirl, Kara is born before Superman; she is a teenager when he is a baby. She is sent in a rocket in suspended animation to look after the infant Kal-El; however, her rocket gets caught in the explosion of Krypton and becomes encased in a Kryptonite asteroid. She arrives on Earth years after Kal-El has grown up and become known as Superman. Due to this extended period of suspended animation, she is "younger" than her cousin (she is referenced to be about 16, while Superman is portrayed to be about 29. At the end of "The Supergirl from Krypton" arc, her cousin Superman officially introduces her to all the heroes of the DC Comics Universe. Then she adopts the Supergirl costume and accepts the name.

A new Supergirl series, written by Jeph Loeb, began publication in August 2005. The storyline in the first arc of Supergirl depicts a darker, evil version of Kara emerging when Lex Luthor exposes her to Black Kryptonite. The evil Supergirl implies that Kara's family sent her to Earth to kill Kal-El as revenge for a family grudge; at the time, Kara herself refuses to believe this, but later flashbacks indicate that not only is this partly true, but Kara had been physically altered by her father as a child before being involved in several murders on Krypton. This was later revealed to be delusions as a result of kryptonite poisoning. Upon being cured she adopted a personality more like that of her golden age persona.

If all this wasn't confusing enough, several different versions of Supergirl have appeared in the continuity of the DC Universe including:

Power Girl (Kara Zor-L)
Power Girl is an older version of Supergirl (below left) with a different costume and personality. Her parents are Zor-L and Alura In-Z. Power Girl’s origin differs from Supergirl’s. Instead of being born years after Superman and growing up in Argo, Power Girl was born on Krypton. She was a child and sent away in a starship at the same time as her infant cousin Kal-L, but her ship went off course and took much longer to reach Earth, by which point Kal-L had lived on Earth-2 for decades and already established himself as Superman.

Young Kara Zor-L (who later adopts the alias Karen Starr) lives with Earth-2’s Clark Kent and Lois Lane-Kent for a few years and comes to see them as second parents. As an adult, she assumes the costumed role of Power Girl and quickly joins the Justice Society of America. As many of the JSA heroes were patriotic champions of World War II, it’s fitting that she wears an outfit of red, white and blue. Just as Supergirl is close friends with Batgirl, Power Girl becomes close with Helena Wayne (Earth-2 Bruce Wayne’s daughter) AKA Huntress.

As part of the New 52, the reintroduced Power Girl is now from Earth 2, and had used the name Supergirl in that universe.

Laurel Gand (Andromeda)

Laurel Gand (above right) was the post-Crisis/Glorithverse replacement for the pre-Crisis Supergirl in the Legion of Super-Heroes after the latter was removed from the continuity following The Man of Steel reboot of Superman. Originally, Laurel is simply known by her given name. A younger version of Laurel takes the superhero codename "Andromeda" shortly before the Zero Hour reboot of the Legion; post-reboot, Laurel remains Andromeda.

Ariella Kent
Ariella Kent (right), Supergirl of the 853rd century, later revealed to be the daughter of post-Crisis Linda Danvers and Silver Age style Superman from the Many Happy Returns story arc.

When Linda Danvers tried to take the place of pre-Crisis Kara Zor-El, she unknowingly won the heart of the pre-Crisis version of Superman. The two married, and had a daughter named Ariella Kent (R'E'L in Kryptonian). When Spectre came to send Linda back to the post-Crisis era, and return the pre-Crisis to its original state (and replace her with Kara), Linda agreed on the condition that Ariella would be spared. The Spectre agreed to her terms, and when all traces of Linda Danvers' existence were wiped from the pre-Crisis era, Ariella was left alone to wander the universe.

A hybrid of metahuman/Kryptonian heritage, Ariella possesses vast powers for her young age. She has incredible superhuman strength and speed. She can fly, travel through time at will, move objects via telekinesis, and teleport anywhere she wishes. She is invulnerable, and ages at an extremely slow rate, energy blasts, energy absorption and also duplication. She also has X-ray vision and heat vision. Due to her high level of power and young age, Ariella can be highly destructive, as she has not learned to hold back her abilities. Possessing these incredible powers at the very tender age of 6, Ariella began to play in space, unknowingly causing massive devastation. Her ability to time-travel carried her to the 853rd century, where she saved a planet from destruction by playing with the invaders (and accidentally destroying all of their ships and weapons). Later, she would time-traveled to the post-Crisis era, shortly after the "Sins of Youth" storyline. Her whereabouts now are unknown, but it is assumed she is still having adventures somewhere.

The first live action depiction of Supergirl was in the 1984 film, starring Helen Slater as Supergirl (below). The film is a spinoff from the Superman film series starring Christopher Reeve, to which it is connected by Marc McClure's character Jimmy Olsen. Its plot concerns Supergirl, Superman's cousin, leaving her isolated Kryptonian community of Argo City for Earth in an effort to retrieve the unique "Omegahedron", which has fallen into the hands of the evil witch Selena (Faye Dunaway). The film was poorly received by fans and at the box office.

In the seventh season (2007 - 2008) of the CW's hit show Smallville, Kara is introduced into the cast and was portrayed by Laura Vandervoort (below left). Smallville depicts her as Clark's (Tom Welling) cousin, whose spacecraft became trapped in stasis until the events of the sixth season finale, when the destruction of the dam that the ship had landed nearby disrupted the stasis systems and allowed Kara to wake up.

Much of season seven is concerned with Kara's attempts to adjust to life on Earth, especially after learning of Krypton's destruction and the fact that her 'younger' cousin is now at least the same age as her. Her storyline sees her simultaneously become the object of Lex Luthor's (Michael Rosenbaum) obsessions and Jimmy Olsen's (Aaron Ashmore) affections, suffer a bout of amnesia, discover her father's (Christopher Heyerdahl) sinister motives and become a target of evil android Brainiac (James Marsters). In the season finale, Kara becomes trapped in the Phantom Zone, and Vandervoort was no longer a regular in the show's eighth season . However, she made one guest appearance in the episode "Bloodline", where Clark and Lois are transported to the Phantom Zone and return with Kara. At the end of the episode, she leaves Smallville to search for Kandor. Vandervoort reprised the role in season ten's "Supergirl", in which Kara saves a group of people at an anti-hero rally led by Gordon Godfrey (Michael Daingerfield). In the episode, she is sent by Jor-El (the AI at the Fortress of Solitude) to become a champion to the people of Earth, and rescues Clark from Darkseid. She appears for a final time in the series' penultimate episode, "Prophecy". Kara is summoned by Jor-El to the Fortress, where she is told she can either assist Clark and therefore alter his destiny, or leave Earth and face her own. Kara decides on the latter, and uses a Legion of Super-Heroes ring to time travel to parts unknown.

Supergirl was voiced by Nicholle Tom in Superman: The Animated Series (below left), an American television show. She is depicted as Kara In-Ze, not Superman's cousin as in the comic book, but rather a near-Kryptonian from Krypton's sister planet Argos, whom Superman brings back to Earth and treats as a cousin. As continued in Justice League Unlimited, she and Superman grow very close, almost like siblings, but she departs when she falls in love with Brainiac 5 of the Legion of Super-Heroes in the distant future, feeling that she had never really fit in on Earth in the present.

Superman/Batman: Apocalypse (below right), a direct-to-video animated film released in September 2010, largely parallels the origin-story arc launched in the Superman/Batman comic series in 2004, with some minor plot differences. Kara Zor-El, voiced by Summer Glau, is described unambiguously as Kal-El's cousin from Krypton.

In 2014, CBS had given a series commitment to a television series featuring Supergirl, which primarily focuses on Kara Zor-El as a 24-year-old cousin of Superman. Executive producers for the series include Greg Berlanti (also a creator/producer for Arrow and The Flash), Ali Adler and Sarah Schechter. In January 2015, Melissa Benoist was cast in the role of Supergirl (below). The series premiered on October 26th, 2015 to positive ratings. In May 2016 CBS announced that Supergirl was renewed for a second season and will be moving to the CW (which is owned by CBS) which is also home of The Flash and Arrow.

The costume for TVs Supergirl was created by Colleen Atwood, who also designed the costumes for Arrow and The Flash. Atwood indicated that she wanted to "embrace the past" and the costume is more of the "classic" Supergirl look, avoiding exposing the character's midriff, as it does in the more recent comic books, as well as having Benoist wear stockings underneath the skirt with over-the-knee boots. Abrams compared the texture of the costume to that worn by Henry Cavill as Superman in Man of Steel, as well as the positioning of the cape on the suit, and the decision to do away with the bright blue and red color scheme of the comic book and using darker tones. Works for us.

What super-villain killed the Man of Steel in Superman #75?

Lex Luthor
Brainiac
Doomsday
Bane

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All Superman and DC Universe characters and merchandise are copyright © and property of Warner Brothers, DC Comics, and/or their subsidiaries and licensors.

 

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